It doesn't matter where you're sitting in the car -- you need to buckle up.

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety has come out with an eye-opening study that found 72% of adults buckle up while in the back seat of a car. That number plunges to 57% when riding in hired cars, such as taxi or Uber vehicles.

Ironically, this data contrasts with stats saying 90% of drivers use seat belts. So, why aren't folks buckling up when they ride in the rear of a car? The IIHS says people mistakenly think they are safer riding in the back than they are in the front and therefore may not need to use a belt.

"Although safety belts are proven to save lives, more than half of the people who die in passenger vehicle crashes in the U.S. each year are unbelted," reports the IIHS. "One person's decision not to buckle up can have consequences for other people riding with them."

Adults between the ages of 35 and 54 are the most likely not to wear a seat belt in the back seat, while men are more likely than women not to buckle up. College-educated adults also wear belts in comparison to those who are less educated.

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